Veterinary Hospital Websites Ireland, Ltd. © 2017  All Rights Reserved   All Images & Content Subject to Copyright  IE #542539 Animal Hospital Website Design by Vet Web Designers - Your Rx for Veterinarian Websites Kendra Ryan Camp Christian Veterinary Fellowship
Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex 4318 E Army Post Rd   Des Moines, IA 50320
DES MOINES VETERINARIANS | ANIMAL HOSPITAL | CAT HOSPITAL | PET REHABILITTION | SERVING DES MOINES & SURROUNDING COMMUNTIES

Veterinarians for Rabbits, Pocket Pets, Ferrets, and Reptiles

CARING FOR YOUR RABBIT There are many different breeds of domestic rabbits. Rabbits make good pets and can be house trained. Females are called does and males are referred to as bucks.  Older bucks and some does that have given birth to a litter of kits (baby bunnies) develop strong territorial instincts and may bite people, but usually only if provoked. Rabbits can also inflict painful scratches if improperly restrained or if naturally aggressive. Some breeds are more aggressive than others, with Dutch rabbits being more aggressive than New Zealand Whites and Lops. Rabbits thump using both hind limbs as an isolated response to a fearful or painful situation.  Rabbits begin approaching sexual maturation when older than three months (depending on the breed, nutritional status and health) and at that time, they may begin attacking each other. So, once they reach that age, they should usually be housed individually.  In some circumstances, female groups established before sexual activity begins, may be housed together.  Mature rabbits should only be paired at mating.  Neutering will usually decrease aggression.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Rabbits are fairly hardy animals, and many health problems are the result of poor diet, lack of cleanliness or improper handling, which may result in injuries.  X-rays or ultrasound may be necessary to diagnose stones in the urinary tract.  Bacterial bladder infections can also occur.  Rabbits may suffer from a variety of gastrointestinal ailments. Dietary changes, antibiotic therapy causing diarrhea, stress, and in some cases, genetic predisposition, may lead to GI problems.
CARING FOR YOUR FERRET Your pet ferret, like many animals, will often hide signs of illness or distress. It's up to you as a pet parent to notice any changes in your ferret’s health. If you observe any anything outside your ferret's normal behavior, call us to schedule an appointment for a veterinary examination.  Annual examinations are a must to maintain your ferret's good health. In addition to addressing any congenital problems or detecting or treating diseases, our veterinarians will administer required vaccinations. Our veterinarians also can show you how to clip your ferret’s nails, a task you'll regularly need to perform.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Ferrets need to be vaccinated yearly against rabies and canine distemper.  Canine distemper is an airborne disease and is much more common in ferrets than rabies. It is deadly to unvaccinated ferrets. Even if your ferret never leaves the house or never has contact with other animals, you can still bring the virus into the house on your clothes and shoes, so it is important to stay up to date on your ferret's distemper vaccination.
Dr. Jessica Thistle will be happy to meet your special pet to discuss any health concerns you may have, to ensure that your companion has a long and happy life. Common examples of reptiles include: gecko, skink, turtle, tortoise, snake, iguana, bearded dragon, other lizards. Common examples of amphibians include: salamander, frog, toad. Common examples of small mammals include: ferret, rabbit, guinea pig, chinchilla, hamster, gerbil, mouse, rat. Surgeries include: Spay or neuter for small mammals, mass removal, abscess drainage, and other soft tissue surgery; Diagnostics such as x-ray, ultra sound, FNAs/biopsies, can also be performed.   DR. THISTLE SEES ONLY NON-VENOMOUS REPITLES:  Snakes should be transported in a pillow case (make sure there are no holes).  Snakes can be placed in the pillow case and the top loosely knotted.  Boxes or similar containers can be used for lizards or small mammals - (again, no holes). The pet’s environmental temperature MUST be controlled by the owner during transportation.  Pet owners should try to ensure their pets do not get cold or hot during transport.
BIRDS:  Dr. Christie Carlo is available for beak trimming and toenail cutting. Call Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex to schedule an appointment for your exotic pet at 515-262-6111 today!
CARING FOR YOUR REPTILE & AMPHIBIAN Reptiles and amphibians are very well adapted to their native environments, but that also means that they have very specific environmental and dietary requirements.  With improper supplements and husbandry, reptiles can suffer from certain nutritional or environmental deficiencies.  In many cases these deficiencies can have a profound effect on their health and be the underlying cause of the illness that brings them to the veterinarian.  In diurnal reptiles, illness can be caused by lack of proper UV lighting.  Nocturnal reptiles often suffer from a lack of proper supplements.  Parasites are very common among pet reptiles.  Reptiles who suffer impaction tend to be housed on a loose substrate.  They may have improper heating, or fed prey items that are too large to properly digest.  Vitamin and mineral deficiencies can affect growth, the immune system and the health of various organs. Routine physical examination will help your exotic pet live a longer and healthier life.  Reptiles, like any other pet suffer their own ailments, some of which are preventable, while others are hereditary.  Routine examinations should be done annually to ensure the longest, happiest and healthiest life possible.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Reptiles and amphibians have health concerns and illnesses just like any other animals.  Medical concerns can come from injuries, parasites, bacteria, viruses and nutritional deficiencies.  The types of diseases of these animals are as unique as they are.  As members of your family, we feel that they deserve to have the same level of care that is expected for dogs, cats or people.  Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex provides a full range of high quality medicine for these special animals, including radiography, full lab testing and anesthesia for wound care or minor surgery.
CARING FOR YOUR POCKET PETS Evaluating your small pocket pet allows a better picture into the overall health of your companion.  So much of their health depends on their environment, age, species and diet.  A physical examination includes full nutritional and environmental counseling. Tests can be run to look for parasites, evaluate overall health and sometimes to look for specific disease conditions. Your pet’s samples will be evaluated in our on-site laboratory by one of our veterinarians qualified in treating small mammals and exotic pets.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Many conditions such as minor wounds, can be treated effectively in hospital.  Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex offers comprehensive diagnostic and treatment options for your pocket pet companion.
Main Hospital - 515-262-6111 Toll Free - 800-339-4873
Veterinarians Serving Des Moines | Animal Hospital | Cat Hospital Veterinary Hospital Websites, Ltd.  © 201All Rights Reserved   All Images & Text Subject  to Copyright  IE #542539 Animal Hospital Website Design by Vet Web Designers Kendra Ryan Camp Christian Veterinary Fellowship
Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex 4318 E Army Post Rd   Des Moines, IA 50320
Main Hospital Toll Free
CARING FOR YOUR RABBIT There are many different breeds of domestic rabbits. Rabbits make good pets and can be house trained. Females are called does and males are referred to as bucks.  Older bucks and some does that have given birth to a litter of kits (baby bunnies) develop strong territorial instincts and may bite people, but usually only if provoked. Rabbits can also inflict painful scratches if improperly restrained or if naturally aggressive. Some breeds are more aggressive than others, with Dutch rabbits being more aggressive than New Zealand Whites and Lops. Rabbits thump using both hind limbs as an isolated response to a fearful or painful situation.  Rabbits begin approaching sexual maturation when older than three months (depending on the breed, nutritional status and health) and at that time, they may begin attacking each other. So, once they reach that age, they should usually be housed individually.  In some circumstances, female groups established before sexual activity begins, may be housed together.  Mature rabbits should only be paired at mating.  Neutering will usually decrease aggression.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Rabbits are fairly hardy animals, and many health problems are the result of poor diet, lack of cleanliness or improper handling, which may result in injuries.  X-rays or ultrasound may be necessary to diagnose stones in the urinary tract.  Bacterial bladder infections can also occur.  Rabbits may suffer from a variety of gastrointestinal ailments. Dietary changes, antibiotic therapy causing diarrhea, stress, and in some cases, genetic predisposition, may lead to GI problems.
CARING FOR YOUR POCKET PETS Evaluating your small pocket pet allows a better picture into the overall health of your companion.  So much of their health depends on their environment, age, species and diet.  A physical examination includes full nutritional and environmental counseling. Tests can be run to look for parasites, evaluate overall health and sometimes to look for specific disease conditions. Your pet’s samples will be evaluated in our on-site laboratory by one of our veterinarians qualified in treating small mammals and exotic pets.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Many conditions such as minor wounds, can be treated effectively in hospital.  Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex offers comprehensive diagnostic and treatment options for your pocket pet companion.
CARING FOR YOUR REPTILE & AMPHIBIAN Reptiles and amphibians are very well adapted to their native environments, but that also means that they have very specific environmental and dietary requirements.  With improper supplements and husbandry, reptiles can suffer from certain nutritional or environmental deficiencies.  In many cases these deficiencies can have a profound effect on their health and be the underlying cause of the illness that brings them to the veterinarian.  In diurnal reptiles, illness can be caused by lack of proper UV lighting.  Nocturnal reptiles often suffer from a lack of proper supplements.  Parasites are very common among pet reptiles.  Reptiles who suffer impaction tend to be housed on a loose substrate.  They may have improper heating, or fed prey items that are too large to properly digest.  Vitamin and mineral deficiencies can affect growth, the immune system and the health of various organs. Routine physical examination will help your exotic pet live a longer and healthier life.  Reptiles, like any other pet suffer their own ailments, some of which are preventable, while others are hereditary.  Routine examinations should be done annually to ensure the longest, happiest and healthiest life possible.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Reptiles and amphibians have health concerns and illnesses just like any other animals.  Medical concerns can come from injuries, parasites, bacteria, viruses and nutritional deficiencies.  The types of diseases of these animals are as unique as they are.  As members of your family, we feel that they deserve to have the same level of care that is expected for dogs, cats or people.  Avondale Veterinary Healthcare Complex provides a full range of high quality medicine for these special animals, including radiography, full lab testing and anesthesia for wound care or minor surgery.
CARING FOR YOUR FERRET Your pet ferret, like many animals, will often hide signs of illness or distress. It's up to you as a pet parent to notice any changes in your ferret’s health. If you observe any anything outside your ferret's normal behavior, call us to schedule an appointment for a veterinary examination.  Annual examinations are a must to maintain your ferret's good health. In addition to addressing any congenital problems or detecting or treating diseases, our veterinarians will administer required vaccinations. Our veterinarians also can show you how to clip your ferret’s nails, a task you'll regularly need to perform.
MEDICAL CONCERNS Ferrets need to be vaccinated yearly against rabies and canine distemper.  Canine distemper is an airborne disease and is much more common in ferrets than rabies. It is deadly to unvaccinated ferrets. Even if your ferret never leaves the house or never has contact with other animals, you can still bring the virus into the house on your clothes and shoes, so it is important to stay up to date on your ferret's distemper vaccination.